Global Climate Agreement

In addition to formal intergovernmental negotiations, countries, cities and regions, businesses and civil society members around the world are taking steps to accelerate climate cooperation efforts to support the Paris Agreement as part of the Global Climate Agenda. It is rare that there is a consensus among almost all nations on a single subject. But with the Paris agreement, world leaders agreed that climate change was driven by human behaviour, that it was a threat to the environment and to humanity as a whole, and that global action was needed to stop it. In addition, a clear framework has been put in place for all countries to make commitments to reduce emissions and strengthen these measures over time. Here are some of the main reasons why the agreement is so important: countries are also working to reach a global peak in greenhouse gas emissions «as quickly as possible.» The agreement has been described as an incentive and engine for the sale of fossil fuels. [13] [14] On the eve of the Paris climate change conference, the EU presented its National Contribution Project (INDC) to the secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The EU`s INDC expresses the EU`s commitment to the negotiation process for a new legally binding agreement on climate change to keep global warming below 2oC. It also reaffirmed the binding target of reducing domestic greenhouse gas emissions by at least 40% by 2030 compared to 1990, as indicated by the conclusions of the European Council in October 2014. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was established by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations Environment to provide an objective source of scientific information. In 2013, the IPCC clarified the role of human activities in climate change by publishing its fifth assessment report. It is categorical in its conclusion: climate change is real and human activity is the main cause. Specific results of increased attention to adjustment financing in Paris include the announcement by the G7 countries of $420 million for climate risk insurance and the launch of a Climate Risk and Early Warning Systems (CREWS) initiative. [51] In 2016, the Obama administration awarded a $500 million grant to the «Green Climate Fund» as «the first part of a $3 billion commitment made at the Paris climate talks.» [52] [53] [54] To date, the Green Climate Fund has received more than $10 billion in commitments.