Map Of The Sykes-Picot Agreement

The Franco-English statement was read in the minutes, Pichon commented that it showed the disinterested position of the two governments towards the Arabs and Lloyd George, that it was «more important than all the old agreements». [91] Pichon also referred to a February 15 contract proposal, based on the private agreement reached last December between Clemenceau and Lloyd George. [91] (According to Lieshout, just before Faisal made his presentation at the conference on the 6th, Clemenceau gave Lloyd George a proposal that seems to deal with the same subject; Lieshout dated related British materials to the 6th, while the date is not established in the minutes. [92]) His foreign policy adviser Edward House was then informed by British Foreign Secretary Arthur Balfour of the deal which, 18 months later, was to put his name in a statement that would have an even more fatal impact on the region. The formal agreements between Britain, France and Russia consisted of the following eleven letters. In the Constantinople Agreement of March 18, 1915, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Sazonov wrote to the ambassadors of France and Great Britain after the start of naval operations, before the Gallipoli campaign, and claimed Constantinople and the Dardanelles. During a series of five-week diplomatic talks, Britain and France agreed, under their own claims, on a wider sphere of influence in Iran in the case of Britain and on the annexation of Syria (including Palestine) and Cilicia for France. British and French claims agreed and all parties agreed that the proper management of the holy sites should be left to later regulation. [18] Without the Russian revolutions of 1917, Constantinople and The Strait could have been handed over to Russia after the Allied victory.

This agreement and the Sykes-Picot agreement were complementary, as France and Britain first had to satisfy Russia to conclude the partition of the Middle East. [19] At a meeting in a railway car in Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne, on April 19, 1917, a provisional agreement was reached between the British and French Prime Ministers, David Lloyd George and Alexandre Ribot, as well as the Italian Prime Minister and Foreign Minister Paolo Boselli and Sidney Sonnino, to settle Italian interests in the Ottoman Empire, in particular Article 9 of the Treaty of London. [38] The agreement was necessary by the Allies to secure the position of the Italian armed forces in the Middle East. . . .